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Lewis : conglobo

conglobo, conglŏbo, āvi, ātum, 1, v a., to gather into a ball, to make spherical, to conglobate (in good prose). Prop., constr. usu. absol., or with in and acc.; rarely with in and abl.: mare medium locum expetens conglobatur undique aequabiliter, Cic. N. D. 2, 45, 116: hic (prester) rate funditur, illud (fulmen) conglobatur impetu, Plin. 2, 49, 50, § 134; App. de Mundo, p. 62, 2.

More freq. in part. perf.: terra ipsa in sese nutibus suis conglobata, Cic. N. D. 2. 39, 98; so, astra nisu suo, id. ib. 2, 46, 117: figura, id. Ac. 2, 37, 118: sanguis, Plin. 23, 2, 28, § 59: homo in semet, id. 10, 64, 84, § 183.—And in tmesis: corpuscula complexa inter se conque globata, * Lucr. 2, 154.—Hence, In gen., to press together in a mass, to crowd together: apes, ut uvae, aliae ex aliis pendent conglobatae, Varr. R. R. 3, 16, 29: conglobato corpore in pilae modum, Plin. 9, 46, 70, § 153: homo in semet conglobatus, id. 10, 64, 84, § 183.

Freq., in the historians, of the collecting or crowding together of soldiers: uti quosque fors conglobaverat, Sall. J. 97, 4; so, eos Agathyrnam, Liv. 26, 40, 17: se in unum, id. 8, 11, 5; cf. id. 9, 23, 16: in ultimam castrorum partem, id. 10, 5, 9: in forum, id. 5, 41, 6: templum in quo se miles conglobaverat, Tac. A. 14, 32: pulsi ac fugā conglobati, Liv. 44, 31, 9; 25, 15, 15.—Absol.: fors conglobabat (sc. milites), Liv. 22, 5, 7. —Also of the elephant: conglobatae beluae, Liv. 27, 14, 8.—* Trop.: definitiones conglobatae, heaped together, accumulated, Cic. Part. Or. 16, 55.