Close Window

Lewis : coniunx

coniunx conjunx or conjux (in inscrr. also COIVX, e. g. Orell. 4655; 4644; 4646; 5013: COIVNX, C. I. L. 1, 1011: CONIVNCX, ib. 5, 370; v. Neue, Formenl. I. p. 139 sq.), jŭgis, comm. (fem. conjŭga Jovis Juno, App. M. 6, p. 174, 33, and in inscrr.) [conjungo]. One who is united in marriage, a consort, spouse, wife; more rarely, a husband (very freq., esp. in fem. and in the poets; in Ov. M. alone about fifty times); masc., Cic. Cael. 32, 78; id. Tusc. 4, 32, 69; Tac. A. 3, 34; 13, 44; Just. 2, 4, 8; Val. Max. 2, 6, 14; Cat. 61, 32; 68, 81; Verg. A. 6, 473; Ov. M. 1, 605; 6, 538; Sen. Cons. Helv. 19, 5; Hyg. Fab. 23; Inscr. Orell. 4629.—Fem., Lucr. 4, 1274; Poët. ap. Cic. N. D. 3, 27, 68; Cic. Cat. 4, 11, 24; id. Q. Fr. 1, 3, 3; Quint. 6, 1, 33; Cat. 64, 298; Prop. 1, 19, 7; Hor. C. 1, 1, 26; 3, 5, 5; Tac. A. 15, 15; 17, 11; id. H. 4, 18; 5, 8; id. G. 7.

In plur. for the married pair: boni, Cat. 61, 234: unanimi, id. 66, 80 et saep.

Transf., of animals, the female, Ov. F. 1, 451; Plin. 10, 59, 79, § 161.—And also of the elmtree, round which a vine entwines itself (cf. conjungo, P. a., B. 2. b.), Col. 5, 6, 18.

Poet. A betrothed, a bride, Verg. A. 3, 331; 9, 138; Tib. 3, 2, 4; Ov. H. 8, 18.

A more honorable designation for concubine, Prop. 2, 8, 29; Ov. H. 8, 86; Val. Fl. 2, 208.

In late Lat., = contubernalis, a comrade, a (male or female) companion or attendant, Inscr. Orell. 2841 sq.—So, a fellow-slave: me cum meo famulo meoque vectore ... factum conservum atque conjugem, App. M. 7, p. 189, 6.