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Lewis : conversio

conversio, conversĭo, ōnis, f. id., a turning round, revolving, revolution (class.). Lit. In gen.: caeli, Cic. Div. 2, 42, 89; id. Univ. 6 med.; id. Rep. 6, 18, 18: astrorum omnesque motus, id. Tusc. 1, 25, 62; cf. id. N. D. 2, 19, 49: caelestes, id. Leg. 1, 8, 24.—Hence, The periodical return of the seasons, caused by the revolution of the heavenly bodies: mensium annorumque, Cic. Univ. 14 fin.— Esp., in medic. lang., A turning round, inverting: vesicae, Plin. 8, 42, 67, § 166.—In plur.: vulvae, Plin. 24, 7, 23, § 39.

An abscess, Col. 6, 17, 6.

Trop. In gen., subversion, alteration, change: conversio et perturbatio rerum, Cic. Fl. 37, 94; cf. id. Div. 2, 2, 6: moderatio et conversio tempestatum, id. Fl. 13, 31 fin.— Esp., in rhet., The change or transfer from one species of composition to another, Quint. 10, 5, 4.

The repetition of the same word at the end of a clause, ἀντιστροφή or ἐπιφορά, Cic. de Or. 3, 54, 207; Quint. 9, 1, 33 sq.; Auct. Her. 4, 13, 19 med.The rounding of a period, καμπή, συστροφή : sic enim has orationis conversiones Graeci nominant, Cic. de Or. 3, 48, 186: ut (oratio) conversiones habeat absolutas, id. ib. 3, 49, 190.

A moral change, conversion (late Lat.), Alcim. Avit. 6, 49; esp. with ad: ad verum Deum, Aug. Civ. Dei, 7, 33: ad unum verum Deum sanctumque, id. ib. 8, 24, 2.

A change of view or opinion: tanta conversio consecuta est, Plin. Ep. 9, 13, 18.