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Lewis : corona

corona cŏrōna (in the ante-Aug. per. sometimes written chorona, acc. to Quint. 1, 5, 20; cf. the letter C), ae, f., = κορώνη, a garland, chaplet, wreath. Lit., of natural or artificial flowers, etc. (very freq. used for personal adornment at festivals, when sacrificing, or as a gift for friends, etc., for ornamenting the images of the gods, edifices, victims, the dead, etc.), Lucr. 5, 1399; Lex XII. Tab. ap. Plin. 21, 3, 5, § 7; Plaut. Men. 3, 1, 16; Cic. Fl. 31, 75; id. Leg. 2, 24, 60; Liv. 23, 11, 5; 38, 14, 5; Curt. 4, 2, 2; 4, 4, 5; Hor. C. 1, 26, 8; id. Ep. 2, 2, 96; Tac. A. 2, 57; 15, 12; 16, 4; id. H. 2, 55 et saep.: coronas bibere, i. e. to throw into the cup leaves plucked from the garlands, Plin. 21, 3, 9, § 12. Vid. the artt. sacerdotalis, funebris, sepulchralis, convivialis, nuptialis, natalitia, Etrusca, pactilis, plectilis, sutilis, tonsa or tonsilis, radiata, and pampinea.—Poet.: perenni fronde corona, i. e. immortal, poetic renown, Lucr. 1, 119.—As emblem of royalty, a crown: regni corona = diadema, Verg. A. 8, 505. —Concerning the different kinds of garlands or crowns given to soldiers as a prize of bravery (castrensis or vallaris, civica, muralis, navalis or rostrata, obsidionalis, triumphalis, oleagina, etc.), v. Gell. 5, 6; Dict. of Antiq.; and the artt. castrensis, civicus, muralis, etc.

Esp.: corona fidei, the crown of martyrdom (eccl. Lat.), Cypr. Ep. 58; 60; Lact. Epit. 72, 23; and corona alone, Lact. 4, 25, 10; id. Mort. Pers. 16, 11.

Sub coronā vendere, t. t. of the lang. of business, to sell captives as slaves (since they were crowned with chaplets; cf. Caelius Sabinus ap. Gell. 7, 4, 3; and corono, I.), Caes. B. G. 3, 16; Liv. 42, 63, 12; so, sub coronā venire, id. 9, 42, 8; 38, 29, 11; 41, 11, 8: sub coronā venundari, Tac. A. 13, 39; id. H. 1, 68: sub coronā emere, Varr. R. R. 2, 10, 4.

As a constellation. The northern crown (according to the fable, the crown of Ariadne transferred to heaven; v. Ariadna), Cic. Arat. 351 sq.; Caes. German. Arat. 71; called Gnosia stella Coronae, Verg. G. 1, 222: Cressa Corona, Ov. A. A. 1, 558: Ariadnea Corona, Manil. 5, 21; cf. also Ov. M. 8, 181; Plin. 18, 26, 60, § 224 al.—* The southern crown, Caes. German. Arat. 391.

Meton., of objects in the form of a crown. Most freq., a circle of men, an assembly, crowd, multitude (esp. of judicial assemblies), Cic. Fl. 28, 69; id. Phil. 2, 44, 112; id. Mil. 1, 1; id. Fin. 2, 22, 74; Quint. 12, 10, 74; Suet. Aug. 93 al.; Cat. 53, 1; Hor. Ep. 1, 18, 53; Ov. M. 13, 1 al.—Hence, Milit. t. t., the besiegers round a hostile place, the line of siege or circumvallation, Caes. B. G. 7, 72; Liv. 10, 43, 1; 23, 44, 3; Curt. 4, 6, 10 al.—Also, a circle of men for the defence of a place, Liv. 4, 19, 8.

In arch., the cornice, Vitr. 5, 2; Plin. 36, 24, 59, § 183.

In the agrimensores, an elevated ridge of land as a boundary line, Cato, R. R. 6, 3; Front. Col. 114 and 131 Goes.

The hairy crown over the horse's hoof, Col. 6, 29, 3; Veg. Art. Vet. 1, 13, 1.

Montium, a circular ridge of mountains, Plin. 6, 20, 23, § 73.

The halo round the sun (for the Gr. ἅλως ), Sen. Q. N. 1, 2, 1.