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Lewis : cruor

cruor, crŭor, ōris, m. cf. κρέας, κρύος, caro, crudus. Blood (which flows from a wound), a stream of blood (more restricted in meaning than sanguis, which designates both that circulating in bodies and that shed by wounding): e nostro cum corpore sanguis Emicat exsultans alte spargitque cruorem, Lucr. 2, 194; Tac. A. 12, 47; and: cruor inimici recentissimus, Cic. Rosc. Am. 7, 19 (cf.: sanguis per venas in omne corpus diffunditur, id. N. D. 2, 55, 138 al.; v. sanguis; cf., however, under II.; class.; most freq. in the poets): occisos homines, cruorem in locis pluribus vidisse, id. Tull. 10, 24: nisi cruor appareat, vim non esse factum, id. Caecin. 27, 76: res familiaris, cum ampla, tum casta a cruore civili, id. Phil. 13, 4, 8; id. Mil. 32, 86; id. Inv. 1, 30, 48; Lucr. 1, 883; Sall. C. 51, 9; Plin. 23, 1, 24, § 49; Tac. A. 14, 30; id. H. 2, 21; Suet. Tib. 59; * Cat. 68, 79; Ov. M. 4, 121; 6, 253; 6, 388 et saep.; Verg. G. 4, 542; id. A. 3, 43; 5, 469 al.; Hor. C. 2, 1, 36; id. Epod. 3, 6 et saep.—In plur., Verg. A. 4, 687; Val. Fl. 4, 330; cf. the foll.

Trop.: scit cruor imperii qui sit, quae viscera rerum, the vital power, Luc. 7, 579.

Transf., bloodshed, murder: hinc cruor, hinc caedes, Tib. 2, 3 (38), 60; so Ov. M. 4, 161; 15, 463; Hor. S. 2, 3, 275; Luc. 9, 1022. —In plur., Hor. C. 2, 1, 5; Luc. 7, 636.

Sometimes, poet., i. q. sanguis, for the blood in the body, Lucr. 2, 669; 3, 787; 5, 131; 1, 864 (for which id. 1, 860 and 867, sanguen).