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Lewis : Damascus

Damascus Dămascus (-os, Luc 3, 215; cf. Prob. II. p. 1462 fin. P., p. 121 Lindem.), i, f., Δαμασκός, Heb. Dammesek or Darmesek, the very ancient capital of Coelesyria, on the Chrysorrhoas, celebrated for its terebinths, and, since the time of the Emperor Diocletian, for its fabrics in steel, now Dameshk, Curt. 3, 12 sq.; Plin. 5, 18, 16, § 74; 13, 6, 12, § 54; Flor. 3, 5, 29; Stat. S. 1, 6, 14; Vulg. Gen. 14, 12.—Hence, Damascus, a, um, adj., of Damascus (eccl. Lat.), Vulg. Gen. 15, 2.

Dăma-scēnus, a, um, adj., of Damascus, Damascene: pruna, Plin. 15, 13, 12, § 43; Pall. Nov. 7, 16; Mart. 13, 29; cf. absol., id. 5, 18, 3 (Eng. damson); and pruna Damasci, Col. 10, 404.

Subst.: DAMASCENVS, i, m., a surname of Juppiter, Inscr. Grut. 20, 2.

Plur.: the people of Damascus, Vulg. 2 Cor. 11, 32.

Dămascēna, ae, f. (sc. regio), the region about Damascus, Plin. 5, 12, 13, § 66; in the Greek form Damascene, Mel. 1, 11, 1.