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Lewis : depono

depono, dēpōno, pŏsŭi, pŏsĭtum, 3 (perf. deposivi, Plaut. Curc. 4, 3, 4: deposivit, id. Most. 2, 1, 35; Catull. 34, 8; inf. perf. deposisse, Verg. Cat. 8, 16; part. sync. depostus, Lucil. ap. Non. 279, 19, v. pono), v. a., to lay away, to put or place aside; to lay, put, or set down; to lay, place, set, deposit (freq. in all periods and sorts of writing).—Constr. with acc. alone; or acc. and locative or abl. with or without a prep.; or acc. and adv. of place where, or apud and personal name; rare and doubtful with in and acc. (cf. Krebs, Antibarb. p. 340 sq.).

Lit. In gen.: caput deponit, condormiscit, Plaut. Curc. 2, 3, 81; cf.: caput terrae, Ov. Am. 3, 5, 20: corpora (pecudes), Lucr. 1, 259; cf.: corpora sub ramis arboris, Verg. A. 7, 108: fessum latus sub lauru, Hor. Od. 2, 7, 19: mentum in gremiis mimarum, Cic. Phil. 13, 11, 24 et saep.: onus, Cic. Rosc. Am. 4, 10; id. Sull. 23, 65; Front. Strat. 1, 5, 3 al.; cf.: onera jumentis, Caes. B. C. 1, 80, 2: arma, id. B. G. 4, 32 fin.; id. B. C. 3, 10, 9; Liv. 5, 2 al.; cf.: depositis in contubernio armis, Caes. B. C. 3, 76, 2: arma umeris, Verg. A. 12, 707: anulos aureos et phaleras, Liv. 9, 46: coronam, and, shortly after, coronam Romae in aram Apollinis, id. 23, 11: ungues et capillos, i. e. to cut off, Petr. 104, 6; cf. comas (for which, shortly before, secuit capillos), Mart. 5, 48, 6: crinem, Tac. H. 4, 61 et saep.: argenti pondus defossā terrā, Hor. S. 1, 1, 42: semina vel scrobe vel sulco, to deposit in the earth, to plant, Col. 5, 4, 2; and: stirpem vitis aut oleae, id. 1, 1, 5: malleolum in terram, id. 3, 10, 19: plantas sulcis, Verg. G. 2, 24 et saep.: exercitum in terram (for exponere), to land, Just. 4, 5, 8: hydriam de umero, Vulg. Gen. 21, 46.

Poet. of bearing, bringing forth (as the putting off of a burden): (Latonia) quam mater prope Deliam Deposivit olivam, Catull. 34, 8; cf.: onus naturae, Phaedr. 1, 18, 5; 1, 19, 4; to lay as a stake, wager: Dam. Ego hanc vitulam ... Depono. Men. De grege non ausim quicquam deponere tecum ... verum pocula ponam Fagina, Verg. E. 3, 31 sq.

In partic. Pregn., to lay up, lay aside, put by, deposit anywhere; to give in charge to, commit to the care of intrust to any one: non semper deposita reddenda: si gladium quis apud te sana mente deposuerit, repetat insaniens: reddere peccatum sit, etc., Cic. Off. 3, 25, 95; so, aliquid apud aliquem, Plaut. Bac. 2, 3, 72; Cic. Fam. 5, 20, 2; id. Verr. 2, 4, 12, § 29; Caes. B. C. 3, 108 fin.; Quint. 5, 13, 49; 9, 2, 92; Tac. H. 1, 13; Liv. 38, 19, 2 et saep.; cf.: obsides apud eos, Caes. B. G. 7, 63 al.: praedam in silvis, id. ib. 6, 41; cf.: pecuniam in templo, Liv. 44, 25: pecunias in publica fide, id. 24, 18 fin.; also: liberos, uxores suaque omnia in silvas, Caes. B. G. 4, 19 (dub.—al. in sylvis; id. B. C. 1, 23, 4 the true reading is in publico): impedimenta citra flumen Rhenum, id. B. G. 2, 29, 4: saucios, id. B. C. 3, 78, 1 and 5 et saep.: pretium in deposito habendum, in charge, Dig. 36, 3, 5 fin.: si pro deposito apud eum fuerit, ib. 33, 8, 8, § 5.

To put or bring down, lay upon the ground: scio quam rem agat: ut me deponat vino, etc., to make drunk, Plaut. Aul. 3, 6, 39.

Hence (because it was the custom to take a person who had just died out of bed and lay him on the ground), meton.: depositus, dead, just dead: jam prope depositus, certe jam frigidus, Ov. Pont. 2, 2, 47: depositum nec me qui fleat ullus erit, id. Tr. 3, 3, 40: DEPOSITVS IN PACE, Inscr. Orell. 5014; cf. ib. 4874.—As subst.: depositus meus, Petr. 133, 4.

Also, because the hopelessly sick were often laid on the earth, dying, given up, despaired of: jam tum depostu' bubulcus Expirans animam pulmonibus aeger agebat, Lucil. ap. Non. 279, 19: deponere est desperare, unde et depositi desperati dicuntur, Non. 279, 30: depositus modo sum anima, vita sepultus, Caecil. ap. Non. 279 (Com. v. 121 Rib.): ut depositi proferret fata parentis, Verg. A. 12, 395 Serv.: texere paludes Depositum, Fortuna, tuum, Lucan. 2, 72; and transf.: mihi videor magnam et maxime aegram et prope depositam reip. partem suscepisse, Cic. Verr. 2, 1, 2, § 5.

In post-Aug. lang. esp. freq. in the jurists, of buildings, etc., to pull down, take down, demolish, overthrow: aedificium vel arboris ramos, Dig. 8, 2, 17 (shortly after, qui tollit aedificium vel deprimit); so id. 8, 2, 31; 41, 3, 23 fin. et saep.: deposita arx, Stat. S. 1, 4, 91: statuas, pull down, Spart. Sev. 14: tabulas, destroy, Capit. Max. duob. 12: adversarios tuos, Vulg. Exod. 15, 7.

Trop. With a predominant notion of putting away, removing, etc., to lay down, lay aside, give up, resign, get rid of: studia de manibus, Cic. Ac. 1, 1, 3: ex memoria insidias, id. Sull. 6, 18: in sermone et suavitate alicujus omnes curas doloresque deponere, id. Fam. 4, 6, 2: petitoris personam capere, accusatoris deponere, id. Quint. 13 fin.; so, contentionem, Liv. 4, 6; cf. certamina, id. ib.; and, bellum, Ov. M. 8, 47; Tac. H. 2, 37; opp. incipere, Sall. J. 83, 1; opp. coepisse, Liv. 31, 1; and with omittere, id. 31, 31 fin.: deponere amicitias, suscipere inimicitias, Cic. Lael. 21, 77: invidiam, id. Agr. 2, 26, 69: simultates, id. Planc. 31, 76: maerorem et luctum, id. Phil. 14, 13: omnem spem contentionis, Caes. B. G. 5, 19: consilium adeundae Syriae, id. B. C. 3, 103: imperium, id. B. G. 7, 33 fin.; id. B. C. 2, 32, 9; Cic. N. D. 2, 4, 11; Liv. 2, 28 al.; cf. provinciam, Cic. Pis. 2, 5; id. Fam. 5, 2, 3; dictaturam, Quint. 3, 8, 53; 5, 10, 71: nomen, Suet. Ner. 41; Ov. M. 15, 543: famem, id. F. 6, 530; cf.: sitim in unda vicini fontis, i. e. to quench, id. M. 4, 98: morbos, Plin. 7, 50, 51: animam, i. e. to die, Nep. Hann. 1.

To depose from an office (late Lat.): te de ministerio tuo, Vulg. Is. 22, 19.

(Acc. to no. I. B.) To deposit, intrust, commit to, for safe-keeping: populi Romani jus in vestra fide ac religione depono, Cic. Caecin. 35 fin.: aliquid rimosa in aure, Hor. S. 2, 6, 46: aliquid tutis auribus, id. Od. 1, 27, 18: eo scortum, Tac. H. 1, 13.—Hence, dēpō-nens, entis, P. a., subst. (sc. verbum, lit., a verb that lays aside its proper pass. signif.), in the later grammar. a verb which, in a pass. form, has an act. meaning; deponent, Charis. p. 143 P.; Diom. p. 327 ib.; Prisc. p. 787 ib. sq. et saep.

dēpŏsĭtus, a, um, P. a., and esp. as subst. dēpŏsĭtum, i, n., any thing deposited or intrusted for safe-keeping, etc., a deposit, trust: reddere depositum, Cic. Off. 1, 10, 31: si depositum non infitietur amicus, Juv. 13, 60; cf. Dig. 36, 3, 5 al.: contempto Domino negaverit proximo suo depositum, Vulg. Lev. 6, 2; 1 Tim. 6, 20 al.