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Lewis : fistula

fistula, fistŭla, ae, f. findo, fis-sum. In gen., a pipe, tube, e. g. a water-pipe (usually of lead; syn.: tubus, canalis, sypho), Cic. Rab. Perd. 11, 31; Front. Aquaed. 25 sq.; Plin. 2, 103, 106, § 224; 31, 6, 31, § 58; Ov. M. 4, 122; Inscr. Orell. 3322; 3324; 3892; the wind-pipe and gullet, Plin. 11, 37, 66, § 175; Gell. 17, 11, 4; the tubular vessels in the lungs, Plin. 11, 37, 72, § 188; in the teeth, id. 11, 37, 62, § 163; a hole in a sponge, id. 31, 11, 47, § 123 al.; the blow-hole of the whale, id. 9, 7, 6, § 19.

In partic. A hollow reed-stalk, a reed, cane, Plin. 12, 22, 48, § 106; 19, 5, 23, § 66.

Transf. A reed-pipe, shepherd's pipe, pipes of Pan (made of several reeds gradually decreasing in length and calibre), the Greek σύριγξ, invented by Pan (syn.: tibia, sura): fistula, cui semper decrescit arundinis ordo: Nam calamus cerā jungitur usque minor, Tib. 2, 5, 31; cf. Verg. E. 2, 32 sq.; Ov. M. 1, 688 sq.; 2, 682; 13, 784; Plin. 7, 56, 57, § 204; Hor. C. 4, 1, 24; 4, 12, 10 et al.: eburneola, a pitch-pipe, for giving the tone in which an orator should speak, Cic. de Or. 3, 60, 225 sq.; cf. Quint. 1, 10, 27.

In comic transf.: itaque et ludis et gladiatoribus mirandas ἐπισημασίας sine ulla pastoricia fistula auferebamus, i. e. without being hissed off, Cic. Att. 1, 16, 11.

A writing-reed, Pers. 3, 14.

A sort of ulcer, a fistula, Cels. 2, 8 med.; 5, 12; 7, 4; Plin. 20, 9, 33, § 55; 24, 11, 51, § 88; Cato, R. R. 157, 14; Nep. Att. 21, 3.

Fistula sutoria, a shoemaker's punch, Plin. 17, 14, 23, § 100.

A catheter: aeneae fistulae fiunt, Cels. 7, 26, 1 init.— Fistula farraria, a sort of hand-mill for grinding corn, Cato, R. R. 10, 3; also called fistula serrata, Plin. 18, 10, 23, § 97.