Close Window

Lewis : inductio

inductio, inductĭo, ōnis, f. id., a leading or bringing into, introducing, admission (class.). Lit.: nos aquarum inductionibus terris fecunditatem damus, Cic. N. D. 2, 60, 152: horum (juvenum in circum), introduction, exhibition, Liv. 44, 9, 5; so on the stage: ficta personarum, Cic. de Or. 3, 53, 205: prima trullis frequentetur inductio, a plastering, Pall. 1, 15.—Of a striking out, erasing of writing (cf. induco, 1. C. 3.): lituras, inductiones, superductiones ipse feci, Dig. 28, 4, 1.

Transf., concr. An awning drawn over a theatre to protect the audience from the sun, Vitr. 10 praef.

A fomentation, Cael. Aur. Acut. 2, 27, 216.

Trop. In gen. (acc. to induco II. B. 2. b.), a purpose, resolution, inclination, intention: animi, Cic. Q. Fr. 1, 11, 32; id. Fam. 1, 8, 2: cedet profecto virtuti dolor et animi inductione languescet, id. Tusc. 2, 13, 31.

In partic., rhet. t. t. Induction, a mode of reasoning from known particulars to generals, the Gr. ἐπαγωγή, Cic. Top. 10, 42; id. Inv. 1, 31, 51; Quint. 5, 10, 73; 5, 11, 2 sq.: erroris, id. 9, 1, 31.

Personarum ficta, = προσωποποιΐα, the introduction of a fictitious person, Cic. de Or. 3, 53, 205.

Erroris inductio, = ἀποπλάνησις, a leading into error, misguiding, Cic. de Or. 3, 53, 205.

An assumption, supposition, Prisc. 1144 P.