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Lewis : lignum

lignum, lignum, i, n. prob. root leg-, v. 2. lĕgo; that which is gathered, i. e. for firewood, wood (firewood. opp. to materia, timber for building, Dig. 32, 1, 55). Lit. (class. only in plur.): ligna neque fumosa erunt et ardebunt bene, Cato, R. R. 130: ligna et sarmenta circumdare, ignem subicere, Cic. Verr. 2, 1, 27, § 69: ignem ex lignis viridibus atque umidis fieri jussit, id. ib. 2, 1, 17, § 45: ligna super foco Large reponens, Hor. C. 1, 9, 5: ligna et virgas et carbones quibusdam videri esse in penu, Mas. Sab. ap. Gell. 4, 1, 22.—Prov.: in silvam ligna ferre, i. e. to perform useless labor, or, as we say in English, to carry coals to Newcastle, Hor. S. 1, 10, 34: lignorum aliquid posce, Juv. 7, 24.

In gen., timber, wood: hos lignum stabat in usus, Annosam si forte nucem dejecerat Eurus, i. e. for making tables, Juv. 11, 118.

Transf. That which is made of wood, a writing-tablet: vana supervacui dicunt chirographa ligni, Juv. 13, 137; 16, 41; a plank: ventis animam committe, dolato confisus ligno, id. 12, 58.

The hard part of fruit, the shell (of a nut), or the stone or kernel (of cherries, plums, etc.): bacarum intus lignum, Plin. 15, 28, 34, § 111; 15, 3, 3, § 10: lignum in pomo, id. 13, 4, 9, § 40; of grape-stones, id. 17, 21, 35, § 162.

A fault in table-tops, where the grain of the wood is not curly, but straight, Plin. 13, 15, 30, § 98.

(Poet. and late Lat.) A tree, Verg. A. 12, 767; Hor. S. 1, 8, 1; id. C. 2, 13, 11: lignum pomiferum, Vulg. Gen. 1, 11: lignum scientiae boni et mali, id. ib. 2, 9: lignum vitae, id. Apoc. 2, 9.

A staff, club (eccl. Lat.): cum gladiis et lignis, Vulg. Marc. 14, 43 and 48.