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Lewis : mons

mons, mons, tis (archaic abl. montei, Enn. ap. Non. 222, 33; cf. Ann. v. 420 Vahl.), m. etym. dub., perh. from the root min, whence also, emineo, mentum, minari; cf. minae; lit. a projecting body; hence, a mountain, mount. Lit.: montium altitudines, Cic. N. D. 2, 39, 98: altissimi, Caes. B. G. 3, 1: avii, Hor. C. 1, 23, 2: inaccessi, Plin. 6, 28, 32, § 144: lapidosi, Ov. M. 1, 44.—Prov.: parturiunt montes, nascetur ridiculus mus, said where much is promised but little performed, Hor. A. P. 139.

Transf. A mountain, i. e. a (heaped-up, towering) mass, a heap, quantity: argenti montes, Plaut. Mil. 4, 2, 73: montes mali ardentes, id. Merc. 3, 4, 32; id. Ep. 1, 1, 78: ita mali maeroris montem maxumum conspicatus sum, id. Most. 2, 1, 6: mons in Tusculani monte, i. e. a lofty, splendid building near Tusculum, Cic. Pis. 21, 48: aquae, Verg. A. 1, 105: armorum, Sil. 10, 549.—Of a wagon-load of stones: eversum fudit super agmina montem, Juv. 3, 258; Stat. Th. 1, 145.—Prov.: montes auri polliceri, to promise mountains of gold, to make great promises, Ter. Phorm. 1, 2, 18; so, maria montesque polliceri, Sall. C. 23, 3: magnos montes promittere, Pers. 3, 65.

A mountain-rock, rock in gen. (poet.): fertur in abruptum magno mons improbus actu, Verg. A. 12, 687: Graii, Greek marble, Stat. Th. 1, 145.

Mountain-beasts, wild beasts (late poet.): consumant totos spectacula montes, Claud. Cons. Mall. Theod. 310.