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Lewis : pius

pius pĭus (written PIIVS, Inscr. Viscont. Monum. Degli Scip. tab. 6, n. 1; cf. Cic. Quint. 1, 4, 11), a, um (voc. pie: o crucifer bone, lucisator Omnipotens pie, Prud. Cath. 3, 1.—Comp. only magis pius; cf. Charis. pp. 88 and 130 P.—Sup.: piissimus, used by Antonius, and condemned by Cicero, as: verbum omnino nullum in linguā Latinā, Cic. Phil. 13, 19, 43; but freq. in the post-Aug. per., e. g. Sen. Contr. 4, 27 med.; id. Consol. ad Polyb. 26 med.; Tac. Agr. 43; Curt. 9, 6, 17; Flor. 4, 7, 15; Inscr. Orell. 418 et saep. From rare form PIENS, found in inscriptions, Murat. 1624, 4; Mus. Ver. 129, 3 Maff., is derived another form of the sup., PIENTISSIMVS, Inscr. Orell. 200; 203; 3592), adj. etym. dub.; often referred to τίω, τιμάω, that acts according to duty, dutiful; esp. that performs what is due to the gods and religion in general, to parrents, kindred, teachers, country; pious, devout, conscientious, affectionate, tender, kind, good, grateful, respectful, loyal, patriotic, etc. (of persons and things): si quis pius est, Plaut. Rud. prol. 26: uxor pia et pudica, id. Am. 5, 1, 33: Capus ... pium ex se Anchisen generat, Enn. ap. Philarg. ad Verg. G. 3, 35 (Ann. v. 31 Vahl.): (deos) piorum et impiorum habere rationem, Cic. Leg. 2, 7, 15; id. Rep. 6, 15, 15: di meliora piis, Verg. G. 3, 513: poëta, Cat. 16, 5: pii vates. Verg. A. 6, 662; cf.: pio vatis ab ore, Ov. F. 3, 326.—So as subst. freq. pĭi, of the departed, the blessed: piorum sedes, Cic. Phil. 14, 12: arva piorum, Ov. M. 11, 62: cf. Bentley on Hor. C. 3, 4, 6.—Of things having reference to religion: far, Hor. C. 3, 23, 20: tura, Ov. H. 7, 24; 21, 7: luci, sacred, holy, Hor. C. 3, 4, 6: pia et aeterna pax, a conscientiously kept and eternal peace, Cic. Balb. 16, 35: Poeni homines immolare pium esse duxerunt, id. Rep. 3, 9; cf. Ov. Tr. 1, 2, 96: ore pio, id. M. 7, 172; so, quosque pium est adhibere deos, id. F. 4, 829.

As subst.: pĭum, i, n.: stabit pro signis jusque piumque tuis, justice and equity, Ov. A. A. 1, 200; id. H. 8, 4.—Of respectful, affectionate conduct towards parents, etc.: pius in parentes, Cic. Off. 3, 23, 90: pius Aeneas, on account of his filial love for Anchises, Verg. A. 1, 220; 305; 378; 4, 393; 5, 26 et saep.; cf.: seniorque parens, pia sarcina nati, Ov. H. 7, 107; id. M. 7, 482: pius dolor, Cic. Sest. 2: impietate pia est, she is affectionate (towards her brothers) through want of affection (for her son), her sisterly triumphed over her maternal love, Ov. M. 8, 477: quo pius affectu Castora frater amat, id. Tr. 4, 5, 30: metus, of a wife for her husband, id. M. 11, 389: bellum, waged for one's country or allies, Liv. 30, 31; 39, 36; Sil. 15, 162.

Transf., in gen. Honest, upright, honorable (very rare): pius quaestus, Cato, R. R. praef.

Benevolent, kind, gentle, gracious (postAug.): clementia patrem tuum in primis Pii nomine ornavit, M. Aurel. ap. Vulcat. Gallic. in Avid. Cass. 11: pius enim et clemens es, Dominus Deus, Vulg. 2 Par. 30, 9; id. Ecclus. 2, 13.—Pĭus, a title of the emperors after M. Antoninus, on coins and inscrr.; v. Eckh. D. N. 7, p. 36; 8, p. 453; Inscr. Orell. 840 sq.—Poet., of a wine-jar: testa, my kindly jar, = benigna, Hor. C. 3, 21, 4.—Hence, adv.: pĭē, piously, religiously, dutifully, affectionately: pie sancteque colere deos, Cic. N. D. 1, 20, 56; 1, 17, 45; id. Att. 6, 7, 1: memoriam nostri pie inviolateque servabitis, id. Sen. 22, 81: metuo ne scelerate dicam in te, quod pro Milone dicam pie, id. Mil. 38, 103: pie lugere, id. de Or. 2, 40, 167; Ov. H. 15, 153.—Sup.: quod utrumque piissime tulit, Sen. Cons. ad Polyb. 34, 4.