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Lewis : redemptor

redemptor, rĕdemptor, ōris, m. id.. In all periods of the lang., one who undertakes a thing by way of contract; a contractor, undertaker, purveyor, farmer (syn. conductor); absol.: redemptor qui columnam illam de Cottā et de Torquato conduxerat faciendam, Cic. Div. 2, 21, 47; so Cato, R. R. 107 in lemm.; Cic. Inv. 2, 31, 96: redemptori tuo dimidium pecuniae curavi, id. Q. Fr. 2, 4, 2; Liv. 34, 9 fin.; Hor. C. 3, 1, 35; id. Ep. 2, 2, 72 et saep.

With gen.: tutelae Capitolii, Plin. 35, 3, 4, § 14: pontis, one who farmed the tolls of a bridge, Dig. 19, 2, 60 fin.: vectigalium, ib. 50, 5, 8 et saep.; cf. Fest. p. 270 Müll., and Becker, Antiq. 2, 1, p. 270 and 3, 2, p. 217.

In jurid. Lat.: redemptor litis. One who releases a debtor from a demand, by paying his creditor, Dig. 17, 1, 6 fin.One who, for a consideration, undertakes the risk of a suit (freq.), Dig. 1, 16, 9; Cod. Just. 2, 14 fin.— In eccl. Lat., the Redeemer (of the world from sin), Aug. Serm. 130, 2; Hier. Ep. 66, 8 fin.; Vulg. Job, 19, 25; id. Act. 7, 35 et saep.