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Lewis : cervus

cervus cervus (old orthogr. cervŏs; cf. Quint. 1, 7, 26), i, m. kindr. with cornu and carina, a stag, a deer, Plin. 8, 32, 50, § 112 sq.: alipedes, Lucr. 6, 765: fugax, Hor. C. 4, 6, 34; Ov. Tr. 3, 11, 11: fugientes, Hor. C. 3, 12, 11: pavidi, Ov. F. 5, 173: surgentem in cornua, Verg. A. 10, 725 al.—As a type of fleetness: vincere cervum cursu, Plaut. Poen. 3, 1, 27.

Transf. (from resemblance to the horns of a stag; cf. Varr. L. L. 5, § 117 Müll.): cervi, forked stakes. * As supports of the vine, Tert. Anim. 19.

More freq., In the art of war, as a protection against the enemy, a chevaux-defrise, Caes. B. G. 7, 72; Liv. 44, 11, 4; Tib. 4, 1, 84; Sil. 10, 414; Serv. ad Verg. E. 2, 29.